England in our motorhome

First motorhome trip of the year!

After spending 13 months living in our motorhome and returning to the UK last September we haven’t used our motorhome very much. We’ve had quite a bit of family stuff going on, and that has taken priority.  Our much loved ‘home on wheels’ was put into safe storage, which felt a little strange, after being such a big part of our lives every day. We have had some nights away during the winter and the odd visit to check all was well. I was always a little worried that we would arrive to find a flat battery but the solar panel had done its job and kept the leisure and vehicle batteries charged during the time the motorhome was in storage, without an electric hook up.

Starting the motorhome engine and heading off felt great and we were soon heading along the M62 towards the Yorkshire market town of Knaresborough and the Caravan and Motorhome club site, about 40 minutes walk from the town centre.

Knaresborough Caravan and Motorhome club site

With typical spacious pitches for a Caravan and Motorhome club site it also has a modern restaurant and bar area. We didn’t fancy cooking the first night so we decided to eat in the site restaurant, although we were lucky to get a table without a booking. You can’t beat Yorkshire fish ‘n’ chips and I must say that they were some of the best fish and chips I had ever had. A large piece of cod, perfectly cooked!

The next day we walked into Knaresborough along the road. It was market day and the town was busy with people browsing the market stalls. After a light lunch we decided to walk back along the River Nidd to the campsite and what a beautiful walk along the river and woods it was too.

Parked on our pitch at the Knaresborough Caravan and Motorhome club site.

York Caravan and Motorhome club site

After two nights in Knaresborough it was time to move only few miles east along the A59 to our next destination in York. The Caravan and Motorhome club site on the banks of the River Ouse in York is one of their most popular sites. It’s been said that you have to book months in advance to get a pitch and getting anything more than two nights is difficult. When I booked, I could only get one night, but as we have been to York many times and the main reason for going this time was to attend the Banff Mountain Film Festival, one night was all we needed.

York is, of course, full of character and we had plenty of time to wander around the narrow streets, see wonderful York Minster, have a leisure boat cruise on the river and an unmissable visit to the famous Betty’s tea rooms.

The famous Shambles of York

Magnificent York Minster

Staying at the highest pub in England

Britain’s highest pub – The Tan Hill Inn

Finding places to stay in a motorhome in the UK is not as easy as it is in France, where motorhome parking is an important part of French infrastructure. The French realised many years ago that providing free or cheap overnight parking near to towns, villages and places of interest made economic sense because motorhome owners spend money in local shops, restaurants and tourist attractions. No such common sense exists in the UK where we have to rely on campsites most of the time.

Many pubs, however, offer free parking in their car parks. In return most expect you to eat or drink in the pub – not an unattractive proposition! With this in mind, we headed north on the A1 towards Scotch Corner and the A66. After a few miles along mostly single track roads we arrived at the Tan Hill Inn. At 1,732 ft above sea level it is Britain’s highest pub, and a spectacular place it is too. I’ve read that their is space for 40 motorhomes but that looked to me as though it would be a tight squeeze, however, there were about 12 motorhomes that night. After checking in at the pub and paying our £10 fee ( which goes to a local charity) we put our walking boots on and walked some of the Pennine Way, as the path runs past Tan Hill. That evening we enjoyed good food and listened to some live music before spending a comfortable night in the car park!

The next morning was a cold one, but we had booked breakfast at the Tan Hill Inn and there was a log fire burning so we were soon fuelled up and ready to hit the road again.

Burrs Country Park

Located about a mile north of Bury town centre Burrs Country Park is a fascinating area. Besides having different wildlife habitats Burrs is one of Bury’s oldest industrial sites. Although little remains of cotton mills there is enough to give you an insight into life in the 19th century. Our pitch on the Caravan and Motorhome club site overlooked the East Lancashire Railway line and we were treated to several steam trains passing behind our motorhome.

A steam train passes behind our motorhome at Burrs Country Park.

Back into safe storage

After five nights away in our motorhome it was time to return it back to storage. We use a gold standard CaSSOA approved caravan and motorhome storage facility. Find one here

Our next motorhome adventure will be 2 nights at Ingleton when we need to take our motorhome for a habitation check and service. After that we are going to France for 4-6 weeks. We are going back to motorhome heaven!

Having a few nights away in our motorhome reminded me how enjoyable the motorhome life is and we can’t wait for the next time.

Being seated next to the cake stand at Bettys means you just have to try them!

The famous Bettys Cafe Tea Rooms

The Tan Hill Inn is on the Pennine Way

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2 Comments
  • 16th April 2019 at 12:42 pm

    We liked Burrs and next time we will stay longer so we can properly explore the area.

  • 16th April 2019 at 12:17 pm

    Looks like a great trip. We have stayed at Burrs Country Park even though it is only half an hour away from home!

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